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The Cabin Top

 This is one of the toughest single parts of the boat and a very big webpage... so lets get started hey!
 
 

 I need frames to support the work so i get some cheap bracing ply, 12mm and start cutting to shape and screwing layers of it together to make beams. This is where I finalise camber. Very important to get this right.

I have seen cats where the cabin top is where it goes to shit. Beautiful hulls and spoiled because the cabin is badly shaped and finished. I have nothing on paper, this is all done on the day,.

   get it right.
   set up scrap timber to form support.
   Getting there.
   The aft one is set up with clamps below and supported laterally by the strips screwed into it.
   ...
   There, now you se what I did.
   A tip I got from Dana Freeman, I set the foam sheets out in the sun and they started curling up to form perfectly for my camber! I had one "cooking" while I fastened in the other.
   There would still be a gap toward the middle of the sheets but I cut a "V" in between them any. I wanted glue mix to get in there.
   Now the "V" is cut
   better view here, one side done, a box knife is the tool.
   Foam is prepared! There are screws in many places underneath to hold it to shape as well as brackets on the side and front. where screws are on the top edges, they have been covered in packing tape.
 

 This was done in the hottest time of the year. Humidity was such that it couldn't be done very early or late either. We needed the heat to lower the humidity.

 

So.. preparation is everything. Everything pre-cut and sorted. The top will get two layers of 450gm DB in succession, with edges overlapped and staggered. And then peel ply as well.

 

No way I could do this alone, KK got smelly and sticky right along with me on this one.

Notice the tools all done up with long handles.

   Done! No one to take photos.. it was a hell job. This is right after removing the tarps that were all over protecting the rest of the boat. Resin was flying folks! But the job was done well.
   But how to do the other side? I used some of the cheap ply and made a frame. I tacked the top to it and hauled it done and put it under the boat.
   Cleaned off all the fasteners and did general patching and tidy up.
 

 Laminated in 600 DB....

 

KK would have none of it this time. But ion the cool underneath it was no problem anyway.

   Boog wet on wet
   I painted it and drug it outside.
 

 The port side half i decided to do almost opposite of the first go.

 

I used the starboard top as a form and put all the sheets in the sun at once.

 

 

 

 Once the frames were prepared for the other side I put the first (starboard side) up to use as a working platform and it was fun to check out and see how it looked.

   Foam in place
   Held together and trimmed..
   Crevices cut out and glued where I could get to them..
   Then carefully lifted down to the now altered frame i used to transport down the starboard top.
   Then laminated it with 600 gram DB and scim coat of bogg.....
   And hoisted it back up. The first side gets used as a working platform. It still has the peel ply on it to protect it from the flying resin.
 

 On this side instead of arranging the cloth from side to side it was all done lengthwise but still two layers of 450 gram DB.

And instead of peel ply I bogged it when wet and this is next day going at the bogg before it hardens up too much.

   I pulled the pieces together and taped underneath. Notice the wetting tray I had in place. For overhead taping you can't prepare it too well if you want it right.
   The top is now screwed down to the sides from outside. I want a soft corner here so mixed up a big batch of stiff bogg and applied it with a custom shaped spatula. I'm now wetting the tape, 750 tri ax.
   And start lifting the tape up.
   lifting.......
   I use my spatula to go over the tape and bogg for final shaping. I put a scim coat of bogg on later and once done only needed a light sand to prepare for paint.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
 

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